PHP 5.4.32 Released

pg_fetch_array

(PHP 4, PHP 5)

pg_fetch_arrayFetch a row as an array

Description

array pg_fetch_array ( resource $result [, int $row [, int $result_type = PGSQL_BOTH ]] )

pg_fetch_array() returns an array that corresponds to the fetched row (record).

pg_fetch_array() is an extended version of pg_fetch_row(). In addition to storing the data in the numeric indices (field number) to the result array, it can also store the data using associative indices (field name). It stores both indicies by default.

Note: This function sets NULL fields to the PHP NULL value.

pg_fetch_array() is NOT significantly slower than using pg_fetch_row(), and is significantly easier to use.

Parameters

result

PostgreSQL query result resource, returned by pg_query(), pg_query_params() or pg_execute() (among others).

row

Row number in result to fetch. Rows are numbered from 0 upwards. If omitted or NULL, the next row is fetched.

result_type

An optional parameter that controls how the returned array is indexed. result_type is a constant and can take the following values: PGSQL_ASSOC, PGSQL_NUM and PGSQL_BOTH. Using PGSQL_NUM, pg_fetch_array() will return an array with numerical indices, using PGSQL_ASSOC it will return only associative indices while PGSQL_BOTH, the default, will return both numerical and associative indices.

Return Values

An array indexed numerically (beginning with 0) or associatively (indexed by field name), or both. Each value in the array is represented as a string. Database NULL values are returned as NULL.

FALSE is returned if row exceeds the number of rows in the set, there are no more rows, or on any other error.

Changelog

Version Description
4.1.0 The row parameter became optional.

Examples

Example #1 pg_fetch_array() example

<?php 

$conn 
pg_pconnect("dbname=publisher");
if (!
$conn) {
  echo 
"An error occurred.\n";
  exit;
}

$result pg_query($conn"SELECT author, email FROM authors");
if (!
$result) {
  echo 
"An error occurred.\n";
  exit;
}

$arr pg_fetch_array($result0PGSQL_NUM);
echo 
$arr[0] . " <- Row 1 Author\n";
echo 
$arr[1] . " <- Row 1 E-mail\n";

// As of PHP 4.1.0, the row parameter is optional; NULL can be passed instead,
// to pass a result_type.  Successive calls to pg_fetch_array will return the
// next row.
$arr pg_fetch_array($resultNULLPGSQL_ASSOC);
echo 
$arr["author"] . " <- Row 2 Author\n";
echo 
$arr["email"] . " <- Row 2 E-mail\n";

$arr pg_fetch_array($result);
echo 
$arr["author"] . " <- Row 3 Author\n";
echo 
$arr[1] . " <- Row 3 E-mail\n";

?>

See Also

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User Contributed Notes 12 notes

up
1
jesse at sokieserv dot dhs dot org
12 years ago
As of PHP 4.1.0, you can now use code such as the following to iterate through a result set:

$conn = pg_connect("host=localhost dbname=whatever");
$result = pg_exec($conn, "select * from table");
while ($row = pg_fetch_array($result))
{
     echo "data: ".$row["data"];
}

Can be a nice little time saver, PHP with MySQL has supported this for a while but I'm glad to see it extended to PostgreSQL...
up
0
strata_ranger at hotmail dot com
4 years ago
Note that when using PGSQL_BOTH, numerically and associatively indexed fields are separate variables and treated as such:

<?php
$res
= pg_query("Select 'foo' as bar");

$data = pg_fetch_array($res, 0, PGSQL_BOTH);

var_dump($data);
// Array(2)
// {
//   [0] => string(3) "foo"
//   ["bar"] => string(3) "foo"
// }

// This won't affect $data['bar']
$data[0] = 'bar';

var_dump($data);
// Array(2)
// {
//   [0] => string(3) "bar"
//   ["bar"] => string(3) "foo"
// }
?>

If you want to have reference binding between your numeric and associative indexes, you'll have to establish that yourself:

<?php

$result
= pg_query("Select 'foo' as bar");

$data = pg_fetch_row($result);

// Establish references between column name/number
$from = $data;
foreach(
$from as $cx => $value)
{
   
$key = pg_field_name($result, $cx);
    if (
is_string($key)) $data[$key] =& $data[$cx];
}

var_dump($data);
// Array(2)
// {
//   [0] => &string(3) "foo"
//   ["bar"] => &string(3) "foo"
// }
// Note the reference binding between $data[0] and $data['bar']

$data[0] = 'baz';

var_dump($data);
// Array(2)
// {
//   [0] => &string(3) "baz"
//   ["bar"] => &string(3) "baz"
// }

?>
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0
anonymous
9 years ago
Hopefully most people realize this on their own, but the examples below where people tried to get creative with getting numerical or associative (not both) keys in the result are rather pointless. See the pg_fetch_assoc() and pg_fetch_row() for the built in functions that do this automatically. It's generally a better idea to use one of these other functions unless you *need* to access fields by both collumn name *and* index.
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0
Dave O
9 years ago
I found this out through help from the mailing lists.  If you need to reset the internal counter, use the pg_result_seek, similar to:

pg_result_seek($result, 0)

...plagiarized from the comment on the function's doc page.
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0
devnull
9 years ago
In response to eth0's comment below about SELECT'ing from two tables where the tables have columns with the same names, you can get around this problem like this:

"SELECT table1.foo AS foo1, table2.foo AS foo2 FROM table1, table2"

In the associative array returned, the keys will be "foo1" and "foo2".
up
0
enyo at www.red-link.com
10 years ago
Just because it is not really clear how to specify the result type, I poste this message.

I wrote a wrapper function which looks like this:

<?php
   
function db_fetch_array ($result, $row = NULL, $result_type = PGSQL_ASSOC)
    {
       
$return = @pg_fetch_array ($result, $row, $result_type);
        return
$return;
    }
?>

I think this way it is quite comfortable to get the arrays you want.
up
0
akm at e-nterart dot pl
11 years ago
(Timesaver) Be aware of the fact that keys in array returned by this function are (well, at least as of 4.2.3) of the same case as SQL column names (e.g. if your column name is ID then key name is also ID, not id or Id), and the keys in associative array are CASE SENSITIVE!!! So don't be surprised if you get unexpected results. Double check SQL column names and the key names.
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0
eth0 at fins
12 years ago
Please remember that if you have for example a table Customers with "cust_ID", "name" and "address" and another table Users with "u_ID","name" and "other" and then you SELECT WHERE cust_ID=u_ID then you'll get in the result array ONLY ONE "name" field, precisely the last one resulted from the select!!!
up
0
elliot at nospam dot rightnowtech dot com
13 years ago
Just remember when you 'or die' to close your table(s) or you may get a confused look from non-internet explorer users.
up
0
mkb at ele dot uri dot edu
13 years ago
The column names if you use PGSQL_ASSOC or PGSQL_BOTH are always in lowercase, no matter what the name is in the database or in the query.
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0
gherson at snet dot net
13 years ago
In addition to returning "false if there are no more rows", pg_fetch_array will also trigger an E_WARNING.  You can temporarily turn that error reporting level off and suck out all your data like so:

<?php
$errRptLvl
= error_reporting();
error_reporting($errRptLvl & ~(E_WARNING));
      
list(
$i,$j)=array(0,0);
while (
$selection[$i++] = $this->fetchArray($j++)); // (fetchArray is a pg_fetch_array wrapper.)
error_reporting($errRptLvl); // Restore error reporting level.
unset($selection[$i-1]); // Delete the last, empty row.
return $selection;
?>
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0
gherson at snet dot net
13 years ago
PGSQL_BOTH is the default, meaning your array size will be doubled. 
If you specify this field (result type), include no quotes around it or you won't get any data, not even an error. 
Here's my wrapper function:
function SQL_fetch_array($result_ndx, $row, $result_type=PGSQL_ASSOC) {
   return pg_fetch_array($result_ndx, $row, $result_type);
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