PHP Unconference Europe 2015

mssql_min_error_severity

(PHP 4, PHP 5, PECL odbtp >= 1.1.1)

mssql_min_error_severitySets the minimum error severity

Description

void mssql_min_error_severity ( int $severity )

Sets the minimum error severity.

Parameters

severity

The new error severity.

Return Values

No value is returned.

Examples

Example #1 mssql_min_error_severity() example

<?php
// Connect to MSSQL and select the database
mssql_connect('KALLESPC\SQLEXPRESS''sa''phpfi');
mssql_select_db('php');

// Set the minimum error severity to not include SQL 
// syntax errors by setting it to something greater than 
// or equal to 1.
mssql_min_error_severity(1);

// Send a query we know that will cause an syntax error, in
// this case we use the MySQL quote signs instead of wrapping 
// square brackets around the field and table names.
$query mssql_query('SELECT `syntax`, `error` FROM `MSSQL`');

if (!
$query) {
    
// Custom error handler ...
}
?>

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User Contributed Notes 2 notes

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Daniel J. Coleman
11 years ago
If you have not worked with MS SQL, severity is based on 5 levels.

Level 0:
The code contains a genuine error, and if executed, may not run as expected. For example, a syntax error or a reference to a non-existent method will cause a Level 0 error.

Level 1:
The code is syntactically correct, and has some defined meaning, but it may not be what the programmer was expecting. For example, a statement with no side effects such as x+1 will generate a Level 1 warning.

Level 2:
The code is correct but may cause problems in the future. For example, using deprecated features will generate a Level 2 warning.

Level 3:
The code is correct but may result in bad performance. For example, if type inferencing fails for a variable, a Level 3 warning will be issued.

Level 4:
The code is correct but there may be a better way to accomplish the same thing. For example, using a non-Common Language Specification (CLS) compliant method signature will generate a Level 4 warning.
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